Who Do You Love?

 Moonstone Poetry @ PhillyCAM, 699 Ranstead Street

Who Do You Love?

The program is a talk show style discussion on the life, work and importance of the months -LOVED- with a host and two guests. Following the discussion audience members can participate by reading their favorite poem by the featured poet plus one of their own poems.

December 13, 2016 6:30pm (doors open at 5:30pm)

john-milton2

John Milton (9 December 1608 – 8 November 1674) was an English poet, polemicist, and man of letters, and a civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under Oliver Cromwell. He wrote at a time of religious flux and political upheaval, and is best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost (1667), written in blank verse. Milton’s poetry and prose reflect deep personal convictions, a passion for freedom and self-determination, and the urgent issues and political turbulence of his day. Writing in English, Latin, Greek, and Italian, he achieved international renown within his lifetime, and his celebrated Areopagitica (1644)—written in condemnation of pre-publication censorship—is among history’s most influential and impassioned defenses of free speech and freedom of the press. William Hayley’s 1796 biography called him the “greatest English author”, and he remains generally regarded “as one of the preeminent writers in the English language”, though critical reception has oscillated in the centuries since his death (often on account of his republicanism). Samuel Johnson praised Paradise Lost as “a poem which…with respect to design may claim the first place, and with respect to performance, the second, among the productions of the human mind”, though he (a Tory and recipient of royal patronage) described Milton’s politics as those of an “acrimonious and surly republican”.

Host: Elijah B Pringle, III express himself in the Visual, Performing and Written Arts. He was a lyric baritone, a composer, a dancer, choreographer and actor before dedicating himself mostly to the written art. His essays and poetry have appeared in numerous local and international poetry journals and anthologies.

Guests: John Timpane is Associate Editor of the Editorial Board of the Philadelphia Inquirer. He has published poetry, fiction, essays, criticism, and four books: Writing Worth Reading (coauthored with Nancy H. Packer), It Could Be Verse, Poetry for Dummies (coauthored with Maureen Watts), and Usonia, NY: Building a Community with Frank Lloyd Wright (coauthored with Roland Reiseley);

J.T. Barbarese has published five books of poems, most recently Sweet Spot. His poems and translations have appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, Boulevard, Poetry, The New Yorker and The Times Literary Supplement. Since 2008 he has been the editor of Story Quarterly;

Aaron Hostetter is an Assistant Professor of Old and Middle English at Rutgers University-Camden, where he studies the literary history of food, primarily with an interest in the ways that food is used to discuss political theory. He is an avid translator of Anglo-Saxon poetry and is working on a book, The Political Appetites of Medieval English Romance. see: https://anglosaxonpoetry.camden.rutgers.edu/


 

November 1, 2016, 6:30pm (doors open at 5:30pm)

anne-sexton1

Anne Sexton (November 9, 1928 – October 4, 1974) Erica Jong, reviewing The Death Notebooks “She is an important poet not only because of her courage in dealing with previously forbidden subjects, but because she can make the language sing. Of what does [her] artistry consist? Not just of her skill in writing traditional poems… But by artistry, I mean something more subtle than the ability to write formal poems. I mean the artist’s sense of where her inspiration lies….”

Host: Elijah B Pringle, III express himself in the Visual, Performing and Written Arts. He was a lyric baritone, a composer, a dancer, choreographer and actor before dedicating himself mostly to the written art. His essays and poetry have appeared in numerous local and international poetry journals and anthologies.1

Guests: Joanne Leva is the founder and Executive Director of the Montgomery County Poet Laureate Program (MCPL) and has been writing and performing her poetry since 1991. She has organized poetry readings at Headhouse Square for Earth Day, the Seven Arts Fest on South Street, the Theater of Living Arts (TLA), The Ambler Theater, Musehouse Literary Arts Center, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Lynn Levin’s newest books are the poetry collection Miss Plastique and Birds on the Kiswar Tree, a translation from the Spanish of poems by the Peruvian Andean poet Odi Gonzales. She is co-author of Poems for the Writing: Prompts for Poets, and her poems, essays, short fiction, and translations have appeared in Painted Bride Quarterly, Michigan Quarterly Review, Cleaver, The Hopkins Review, The Smart Set, Young Adult Review Network, and other places.

John Timpane is Associate Editor of the Editorial Board of the Philadelphia Inquirer. He has published poetry, fiction, essays, criticism, and four books: Writing Worth Reading (coauthored with Nancy H. Packer), It Could Be Verse, Poetry for Dummies (coauthored with Maureen Watts), and Usonia, NY: Building a Community with Frank Lloyd Wright (coauthored with Roland Reiseley).

 

Everyone is invited to be in the audience but to read you must register by email larry@moonstoneartscenter.org with Anne Sexton as the subject.


October 4, 2016, 6:30pm (doors open at 5:30pm)

 

plath1

Sylvia Plath (October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963) was one of the most dynamic and admired poets of the 20th century. By the time she took her life at the age of 30, Plath already had a following in the literary community. In the ensuing years her work attracted the attention of a multitude of readers, who saw in her singular verse an attempt to catalogue despair, violent emotion, and obsession with death

June 7th, 2016, 6:30pm (doors open at 5:30pm)

patti smith

Patricia Smith (June 25, 1955) Gregory Orr wrote, “With equal parts art, attitude, and heart, Patricia Smith’s Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah braids together personal narrative and a collective cultural journey. In poems propelled by voice and verve, she moves through the urbanscapes of Chicago and Detroit– conjuring first love and Motown with equal fervor. Her poems simultaneously zip along the textured surface of these worlds and plunge to the soul-depths of the people who inhabit them. And we, her spellbound audience, follow in her sonic wake, grateful to be part of stories so alive with detail and urgent with anguish and purpose.”

Host: Elijah B Pringle, III express himself in the Visual, Performing and Written Arts. He was a lyric baritone, a composer, a dancer, choreographer and actor before dedicating himself mostly to the written art. His essays and poetry have appeared in numerous local and international poetry journals and anthologies.1

April 5, 2016 6:30pm (doors open at 5:30pm)

scott-heron-gil-3

Gilbert “Gil” Scott-Heron (April 1, 1949 – May 27, 011) was an American soul and jazz poet, musician, and author, known primarily for his work as a spoken word performer in the 1970s and 1980s. His collaborative efforts with musician Brian Jackson featured a musical fusion of jazz, blues, and soul, as well as lyrical content concerning social and political issues of the time, delivered in both rapping and melismatic vocal styles by Scott-Heron. His own term for himself was “bluesologist”, which he defined as “a scientist who is concerned with the origin of the blues”. His music, most notably on Pieces of a Man and Winter in America in the early 1970s, influenced and helped engender later African-American music genres such as hip hop and neo soul.

                                                                                   

“I’ve always had questions about what it meant to be a protester, to be in the minority. Are the people who are trying to find peace, who are trying to have the Constitution apply to everybody, are they really the radicals? We’re not protesting from the outside. We’re inside.” 

Host: Elijah B Pringle, III express himself in the Visual, Performing and Written Arts. He was a lyric baritone, a composer, a dancer, choreographer and actor before dedicating himself mostly to the written art. His essays and poetry have appeared in numerous local and international poetry journals and anthologies.1

Guests: Joel Dias-Porter’s poetry engages the act of improvisation through explorations of intimacy, jazz music, and family heritage. In addition to his own CD of jazz and poetry, LibationSong, Dias-Porter is featured on the CD anthology Meow: Spoken Word from the Black Cat. Gina Myers is the author of A Model Year and Hold It Down.  She coedited the tinyfrom 2005 to 2008 with Gabriella Torres. She currently edits Lame House Press and works as senior editor of Coconut Magazine


 

March 1st, 2016, 6:30pm (doors open at 5:30pm)

 Matsuo Basho

Matsuo Basho, The 17th-century Japanese haiku master Basho was born Matsuo Kinsaku near Kyoto, Japan, to a minor samurai and his wife. During his early years Basho studied Chinese poetry and Taoism, and soon began writing haikai no renga, a form of linked verses composed in collaboration. During these early years Basho studied Chinese poetry and Taoism, and soon began writing haikai no renga, a form of linked verses composed in collaboration. His most well-known haibunOku no Hosomichi, or Narrow Road to the Interior, recounts the last long walk Basho completed with his disciple Sora—1,200 miles covered over five months beginning in May 1689. While their days were spent walking, in the evenings they often socialized and wrote with students and friends who lived along their route. The route was also planned to include views that had previously been described by other poets; Basho alludes to these earlier poems in his own descriptions, weaving fragments of literary and historical conversation into his solitary journey.

Host: Elijah B Pringle, III express himself in the Visual, Performing and Written Arts. He was a lyric baritone, a composer. A dancer, choreographer and actor before dedicating himself mostly to the written art. His essays and poetry have appeared in numerous local and international poetry journals and anthologies.

Guest: Michael O’Hara is a New Jersey native, author of The Fine Art of Selling Out and The Year with No Holidays, been published in Apiary and won the Philadelphia “Literary Death Match.”

Guest: Mel Bentley sporadically organizes readings, is author of Obstacle, Particle, Spectacle; Stub Wilderness and &parts.

Everyone is invited to be in the audience but to read you must register by email larry@moonstoneartscenter.org with Bartolt Brecht as the subject.


 

Moonstone Poetry @PhillyCam, 699 Ranstead Street

Who Do You Love?

The program is a talk show style discussion on the life, work and importance of the months -LOVED- with a host and two guests. Following the discussion audience members can participate by reading their favorite poem by the featured poet plus one of their own poems.

February 2, 2016, 6:30pm (doors open at 5:30pm)

brecht

Bertolt Brecht (Feb. 10, 1898 – Aug. 14, 1956) – A poet first and foremost, Bertolt Brecht’s genius was for language. However, because this language is built upon a certain bold and direct simplicity, his plays often lose something in the translation from his native German. Nevertheless, they contain a rare poetic vision, a voice that has rarely been paralleled in the 20th century.

Host: Elijah B Pringle, III express himself in the Visual, Performing and Written Arts. He was a lyric baritone, a composer. A dancer, choreographer and actor before dedicating himself mostly to the written art. His essays and poetry have appeared in numerous local and international poetry journals and anthologies.1

Guest: Ernest Hilbert is a poet, critic, and editor who received a BA from Rutgers University and a PhD in English literature from St. Catherine’s College of Oxford University.

Guest: Kim Bridgeford is a professor of English at Fairfield University, the editor of Dogwood and Mezzo Cammin, and a resident faculty member of Fairfield’s new M.F.A. program on Enders Island, off the coast of Mystic, Connecticut.

Everyone is invited to be in the audience but to read you must register by email larry@moonstoneartscenter.org with Bartolt Brecht as the subject.



 

January 5, 2015, 6:30pm (doors open at 5:30pm)

derek walcott2

Born on the island of Saint Lucia, a former British colony in the West Indies, poet and playwright Derek Walcott was trained as a painter but turned to writing as a young man. He published his first poem in the local newspaper at the age of 14. Walcott’s major breakthrough came with the collection In a Green Night: Poems 1948-1960 (1962), a book which celebrates the Caribbean and its history as well as investigates the scars of colonialism and post-colonialism. Throughout a long and distinguished career, Walcott has returned to those same themes of language, power, and place. In 1992, Walcott won the Nobel Prize in Literature. The Nobel committee depicted his work as “a poetic oeuvre of great luminosity, sustained by a historical vision, the outcome of a multicultural commitment.”

Host: Warren Longmire is a Poet and Computer Programmer is author of Ripped Winters and Do.Until.True, he is a poetry editor for Apiary Magazine, a founding member of the UPenn Excelano Spoken Word Collective and a frequent Philly rep in national slam competitions.

Guest: Aziza Zenzile Kebe

 


 

December 1st, 2015, 6:30pm (doors open at 5:30pm)

Rainer Rilke

Rainer Marie Rilke (4 December 1875 – 29 December 1926) was widely recognized as one of the most lyrically intense German-language poets who invokes haunting images that focus on the difficulty of communion with the ineffable in an age of disbelief, solitude, and profound anxiety. These deeply existential themes tend to position him as a transitional figure between the traditional and the modernist writers.  “Perhaps all the dragons in our lives are princesses who are only waiting to see us act, just once, with beauty and courage. Perhaps everything that frightens us is, in its deepest essence, something helpless that wants our love” – “Go into yourself. Find out the reason that commands you to write; see whether it has spread its roots into the very depths of your heart; confess to yourself whether you would have to die if you were forbidden to write” – “Let life happen to you. Believe me: life is in the right, always.”


“For one human being to love another; that is perhaps the most difficult of all tasks,
the ultimate, the last test and proof, the work for which all other work is but preparation.”

“The purpose of life is to be defeated by greater and greater things.”

“Live your questions now, and perhaps even without knowing it, you will live along some distant day into your answers.” 


Host: Warren Longmire is a Poet and Computer Programmer is author of Ripped Winters and Do.Until.True, he is a poetry editor for Apiary Magazine, a founding member of the UPenn Excelano Spoken Word Collective and a frequent Philly rep in national slam competitions.

Guests: Cynthia Dewi Oka is author of Nomad of Salt and Hard Water, a Pushcart Prize Nominee (2015), Editor’s Prize (Fifth Wednesday Journal2014) and grant from the Vermont Studio Center (2014).

Harry Reichner received both his Bachelor of Arts in German and his Master of Arts in Central and Eastern European Studies and Economics from LaSalle University, he is an adjunct faculty member at Villanova University.

Everyone is invited to be in the audience but to read you must register by email larry@moonstoneartscenter.org with Rilke as the subject.


November 3rd, 2015, 6:30pm (doors open at 5:30pm)

Sharon Olds

Sharon Olds is one of contemporary poetry’s leading voices. Winner of several prestigious awards, including the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Critics Circle Award, Olds is known for writing intensely personal, emotionally scathing poetry which graphically depicts family life as well as global political events. “Sharon Olds is enormously self-aware,” wrote David Leavitt in the Voice Literary Supplement. “Her poetry is remarkable for its candor, its eroticism, and its power to move.” Billy Collins has called her “a poet of sex and the psyche,” adding that “Sharon Olds is infamous for her subject matter alone…but her closer readers know her as a poet of constant linguistic surprise.”

 

“And you couldn’t say,
could you, that the touch you had from me
was other than the touch of one
who could love for life—whether we were suited
or not—for life, like a sentence. And now that I
consider, the touch that I had from you
became not the touch of the long view, but like the
tolerant willingness of one
who is passing through.”

 

Host:Elijah B Pringle, III express himself in the Visual, Performing and Written Arts. He was a lyric baritone, a composer. A dancer, choreographer and actor before dedicating himself mostly to the written art. His essays and poetry have appeared in numerous local and international poetry journals and anthologies.

Guests: Ernest Hilbert is a poet, critic, and editor who received a BA from Rutgers University and a PhD in English literature from St. Catherine’s College of Oxford University.

Kim Bridgeford is a professor of English at Fairfield University, the editor of Dogwood and Mezzo Cammin, and a resident faculty member of Fairfield’s new M.F.A. program on Enders Island, off the coast of Mystic, Connecticut.

Everyone is invited to be in the audience but to read you must register by email larry@moonstoneartscenter.org with Sharon Olds as the subject.


 

Tuesday September 1, 2015, 6:30pm

sonia sanchez 2

“No. Don’t never go looking for love girl. Just wait. It’ll come. Like the rain fallin’ from the heaven, it’ll come. Just don’t never give up on love.”

 

“Let me wear the day
Well so when it reaches you
You will enjoy it.”


“The joy of poetry is that it will wait for you. Novels don’t wait for you. Characters change. But poetry will wait. I think it’s the greatest art.”

 

 

Host: Warren Longmire is a Poet and Computer Programmer is author of Ripped Winters and Do.Until.True, he is a poetry editor for Apiary Magazine, a founding member of the UPenn Excelano Spoken Word Collective and a frequent Philly rep in national slam competitions.

Guests: Yolanda Wisher is a Philadelphia-based poet, singer, musician, and educator, a Cave Canem graduate, and is founder/director of the Germantown Poetry Festival.

Christopher K.P. Brown at the age of 14 wrote his first poem, Teenager, Not Danger, in order to enter Southern Arkansas University’s youth writing competition. Though Teenager, Not Danger was his first attempt at writing poetry he won first place. Thus, a poet was born.

 

Everyone is invited to be in the audience but to read you must register by email larry@moonstoneartscenter.org with Sonia Sanchez as the subject.


Tuesday August 4, 2015, 6:30pm 

bukowski1

“If you’re going to try, go all the way. Otherwise, don’t even start. This could mean losing girlfriends, wives, relatives and maybe even your mind. It could mean not eating for three or four days. It could mean freezing on a park bench. It could mean jail. It could mean derision. It could mean mockery–isolation. Isolation is the gift. All the others are a test of your endurance, of how much you really want to do it. And, you’ll do it, despite rejection and the worst odds. And it will be better than anything else you can imagine. If you’re going to try, go all the way. There is no other feeling like that. You will be alone with the gods, and the nights will flame with fire. You will ride life straight to perfect laughter. It’s the only good fight there is.”-Charles Bukowski

 

Host: Warren Longmire is a Poet and Computer Programmer is author of Ripped Winters and Do.Until.True, he is a poetry editor for Apiary Magazine, a founding member of the UPenn Excelano Spoken Word Collective and a frequent Philly rep in national slam competitions.

Guest: Charles O’Hay, author of Far From Luck and Smoking In Elevators, is the recipient of a 1995 PCA fellowship in poetry, his poems have appeared in over 100 literary publications including Gargoyle, South Carolina Review, Brooklyn Review, West Branch, Mudfish, and New York Quarterly.

Alina Pleskova is a voracious consumer of poetry and cereal. She lives in Philadelphia, but hopes to be one of those people who eventually “divides their time” between two cities. Ideally, she’d like to return to Moscow and reclaim her rightfully-owed Russian accent.  She has a blog but stresses that its content are largely suited for mature audiences only.

 

Everyone is invited to be in the audience but to read you must register by email larry@moonstoneartscenter.org with Charles Bukowski as the subject.

Tuesday July 7, 2015, 6:30pm 

“No writer of world renown is perhaps so little known to North Americans as Chilean poet Pablo Neruda,” observed New York Times Book Review critic Selden Rodman. Numerous critics have praised Neruda as the greatest poet writing in the Spanish language during his lifetime, a difficulty lies in the fact that Neruda’s poetry is very hard to translate; his works available in English represent only a small portion of his total output. Nonetheless, declared John Leonard in the New York Times, Neruda “was, I think, one of the great ones, a Whitman of the South.” “No writer of world renown is perhaps so little known to North Americans as Chilean poet Pablo Neruda,” observed New York Times Book Review critic Selden Rodman. Numerous critics have praised Neruda as the greatest poet writing in the Spanish language during his lifetime, although many readers in the United States have found it difficult to disassociate Neruda’s poetry from his fervent commitment to communism. An added difficulty lies in the fact that Neruda’s poetry is very hard to translate; his works available in English represent only a small portion of his total output. Nonetheless, declared John Leonard in the New York Times, Neruda “was, I think, one of the great ones, a Whitman of the South.”

Tuesday June 9, 2015, 6:30pm-(doors open at 5:30pm)

allen

“Allen Ginsberg was the exemplary avant-garde figure of the post- war world. In verse, in politics, in his own intimate life – there was no room for a “private” life – Ginsberg resisted and disdained the orthodox, the social lie. Few people have done as much to make non- conformism respectable in our time as he did. Surprisingly, though, for one who was feted as a revolutionary as far back as the mid-Fifties, he never became the victim of his own progressiveness. It was never felt about him that he was passé. His liking for experiment did not lead him to the extremes of addiction that claimed, temporarily, William Burroughs and, permanently, Jack Kerouac.” —James Campbell

warren longmireHost: Warren Longmire is a Poet and Computer Programmer is author of Ripped Winters and Do.Until.True, he is a poetry editor for Apiary Magazine, a founding member of the UPenn Excelano Spoken Word Collective and a frequent Philly rep in national slam competitions.

 

maria johnson-valenzuelaGuest: Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela has been recognized by The Leeway Foundation, Hedgebrook and others, is a founder of Thread Makes Blanket Press, and teaches at Community College of Philadelphia.

 

 

molly russakoffGuest: Molly Russakoff is the co-owner of Molly’s, a family owned and operated second-hand book and record store, located in the heart of Philly’s historic Italian Market.

 

ryan ecles

 

Guest: Ryan Eckes was born in Northeast Philadelphia and now writes poems and teaches writing at Temple University and other places.

 

 

 

Everyone is invited to be in the audience but to read you must register by email larry@moonstoneartscenter.org with Allen Ginsberg as the subject.


Tuesday May 5, 2015, 6:30pm-(doors open at 5:30pm)

Walt Whitman

“He wrote a liturgy for mankind; he wrote a great and splendid psalm of life, and he gave to us the gospel of humanity — the greatest gospel that can be preached. He was not afraid to live, not afraid to die. For many years he and death were near neighbors. He was always willing and ready to meet and greet this king called death, and for many months he sat in the deepening twilight waiting for the night, waiting for the light. He never lost his hope. When the mists filled the valleys, he looked upon the mountain tops, and when the mountains in darkness disappeared, he fixed his gaze upon the stars. In his brain were the blessed memories of the day and in his heart were mingled the dawn and dusk of life. He was not afraid; he was cheerful every moment.” —Robert Green Ingersoll

Host: Warren Longmire is a Poet and Computer Programmer is author of Ripped Winters and Do.Until.True, he is a poetry editor for Apiary Magazine, a founding member of the UPenn Excelano Spoken Word Collective and a frequent Philly rep in national slam competitions. 

Guest: Rocky Rainbow is a poet, performance artist and Walt Whitman interpreter who lives near the Delaware River in Camden, New Jersey, where he has been writing and performing for over 30 years.

Guest: Steve Burns is a part-time waiter and carpenter but his real job is poetry. He works as the Web Editor and Outreach Coordinator for APIARY Magazine and Writing Assistant in Rutgers-Camden’s Learning. A highly analytical, collaborative, and imaginative problem conqueror, he also a willing and compassionate leader.

Everyone is invited to be in the audience but to read you must register by email larry@moonstoneartscenter.org with Walt Whitman as the subject.


 

Tuesday April 7, 2015, 6:30pm-(doors open at 5:30pm)

Seamus Heaney2

Poet Paul Muldoon said, “He was the only poet I can think of who was recognized worldwide as having moral as well as literary authority.”Poetry was a vocation that he dedicated his life to, something he believed had “the power to persuade that vulnerable part of our consciousness of its rightness in spite of the evidence of wrongness all around it, the power to remind us that we are hunters and gatherers of values, that our very solitudes and distresses are creditable, in so far as they too are an earnest of our veritable human being.” Uncannily attuned to the voices of the world around him, his poems made both the personal and collective subconscious realms concrete in language.” —Christopher Richards, FSG

Samples of Seamus Heaney’s poetry

Host: Warren Longmire is a Poet and Computer Programmer is author of Ripped Winters and Do.Until.True, he is a poetry editor for Apiary Magazine, a founding member of the UPenn Excelano Spoken Word Collective and a frequent Philly rep in national slam competitions. 

Guest: Nathalie F. Anderson is an award-winning American poet and librettist, Pew Fellow, and author of Following Fred Astaire, Crawlers, Quiver, and in collaboration with composer Thomas Whitman, three libretti: The Black Swan, Sukey in the Dark, and A Scandal in Bohemia.

Guest: John Lavin is President of the Board of Moonstone Inc, Teacher of English, Kensington High School for International Business, Philadelphia School District and has been Adjunct Professor in the Department of English and the Department of Education at Saint Joseph’s University.

Everyone is invited to be in the audience but to read you must register by email larry@moonstoneartscenter.org with Seamus Heaney as the subject.


 

Tuesday March 3, 2015, 6:30pm

(Doors open at 5:30pm)

Amiri Baraka

We had a great show in the middle of the worst weather; those who came out braved the snow, sleet and slippery roadways. If you were not able to attend that is NOT the end, you can see the show the next four Tuesdays. RE- Broadcast on March 10, 17, 24, 31 at 6:30pm on PhillyCAM- Comcast 66/966 & Verizon 29/30

This was a terrific discussion on the life and work of Amiri Baraka, March’s featured (LOVED) poet. Elijah Pringle was host with guests Lamont Steptoe and Nzadi Keita.

baraka

 

Tuesday March 3, 2015, 6:30pm

(Doors open at 5:30pm)

Amiri Baraka

amiri-baraka-

Fusing the personal and the political in high-voltage verse, Amiri Baraka—”whose long illumination of the black experience in America was called incandescent in some quarters and incendiary in others” (New York Times)—was one of the preeminent literary innovators of the past century. Praised for its lyricism and introspection, his early poetry emerged from the Beat generation, while his later writing is marked by intensely rebellious fervor and subversive ideology. All along, his primary focus was on how to live and love in the present moment despite the enduring difficulties of human history.

A new collection of Baraka’s fifty years of poetry will be available at the event: SOS: Poems 1961 – 2014 ($30 Grove Press)

Host: Elijah Pringle continues to express himself in the Visual, Performing and Written Arts. His essays and poetry have appeared in local and international poetry journals and anthologies and Elijah has conducted numerous poetry workshops and is the post of Peotic Quid Pro Quo for the Moonstone Arts Center.

Guest: Sonia Sanchez is a poet, activist and scholar. Recipient of the Robert Frost Medal for distinguished lifetime service to American poetry and the Langston Hughes Poetry Award.  An important member of the Black Arts Movement, she is author of sixteen books, a contributing editor to Black Scholar and th Journal of African Studies and was the first Poet Laureate of Philadelphia.

Guest: Lamont B. Steptoe is the author/editor of fifteen poetry collections, recipient of an American Book Award, a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, 2 fellowships from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and an inductee of the International Hall of Fame for Writers of African Descent by the Gwendolyn Brooks Center at Chicago State University.


 

Tuesday February 3, 2015

doors open 5:30, broadcast live 6:30

Comcast 66/966 & Verizon 29/30

 Langston Hughes

who do you love1“Those whose prerogative it is to determine the rank of writers have never rated him highly, but if the weight of public response is any gauge then Langston Hughes stands at the apex of literary relevance among Black people. The poet occupies such a position in the memory of his people precisely because he recognized that ‘we possess within ourselves a great reservoir of physical and spiritual strength,’ and because he used his artistry to reflect this back to the people. He used his poetry and prose to illustrate that ‘there is no lack within the Negro people of beauty, strength and power,’ and he chose to do so on their own level, on their own terms.”  Black World 1970

who do you love2

Host: Warren C. Longmire, poetry editor, Apiary Magazine; member,  Philadelphia Fuze’s national slam; published in Certain Circuits, Painted Bride Quarterly, Eleven Eleven; author of Ripped Winters and Do.Until.True.

Guests: TS Hawkins is an internationally recognized author, performance poet and an artist of many trades.

Kirwyn Suyterland & Bruce Robinson, founder, FreshVisions Youth Theatre; producer, director, actor, writer; one man shows on Langston Hughes and Martin Luther King, Jr. as well as numerous theater & workshop credits.

Free – Everyone is invited to be in the audience but the

Open Reading is limited  – Register to read by

email larry@moonstoneartscenter.org, subject Langston Hughes

Readers must read a poem by Langston Hughes & then one of their own

 

 

 

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